5 reasons to visit Venice in winter

 

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FEBRUARY 2019

I was at university the first time I visited Venice in winter. The setting was everything I’d imagined it to be, and I was immediately captivated by the mysterious city on water.

Venice is a destination that appeals to every type of traveler. It’s a place where couples can get lost in the side streets, and in each other. Venice is also the meeting point for students studying the inspiring art history and architecture that’s around every turn.

While summer brings the heat, and with it the excitement of possibility, winter brings the calm. And as much as I prefer warmer weather, I’m more drawn to tranquil surroundings, especially when I travel. When winter arrives in Venice, the city becomes even more alluring, with an uninterrupted angle to photograph around every corner.

Visiting Venice in winter

What’s the weather like in Venice in winter?

The weather in Venice come winter can include everything from heavy downpours to snow when the temperatures really dip. Personally, I’ve been really lucky when visiting during the colder months, only experiencing plenty of winter sunshine. Truthfully, Venice in winter can get really cold, but pack the right clothing and you’ll be fine.

Enchanting Venice by night

 

Less tourists in winter

It’ll come as no surprise that there are far less tourists in Venice in winter. The period before Christmas and after the new year is the time I most enjoy visiting.

I get a pang of anxiety when thinking about the number of people that flock to Venice in summer. There’s the hordes of people at Piazzale Roma either arriving, departing, or lining up to buy tickets for the vaporetto. Then there’s getting on the vaporetto itself, and having the (dis)pleasure of being sandwiched between sweaty tourists.

Winter in Venice is a more chilled experience. Sure, you get the occasional irate Venetian losing their cool, and speaking passionately in their local language. But, it’s nothing compared to crowds of tourists from everywhere — some happily shouting, others out of frustration.

Related post – 5 Veneto words and phrases

See where they build the iconic gondolas

 “When winter arrives in Venice, the city becomes even more alluring, with an uninterrupted angle to photograph around every corner.”

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Venice in winter – transport

Vaporetto

On the vaporetto, you can choose, rather than be forced to stand, when visiting during the winter period. I prefer standing to get the best views of Venice, and in winter, there’s no one obstructing your shot.

Gondolas

Along the banks of the canals, you’ll see rows of iconic gondolas, and the gondoliers vying for your custom. Personally, I find the gondola rides too expensive, but I understand it’s a one-off experience for many. A fun and less expensive option is to learn how to row like a gondolier.

Water taxis

Then you have the water taxis. The price can also be costly, but if splitting with family or friends, it’s a chic way to whizz around Venice. Water taxis can also accommodate up to 10 people, so consider it like your personal limousine in Venice.

On foot

From all the transport options available in Venice, nothing beats exploring this incredible city than by foot. It goes without saying that comfortable footwear is essential, because you’ll be walking a lot. In winter, choose something that’ll keep your feet warm and dry, but will still keep you looking stylish. American brand Sorel has a wide range of comfortable yet chic walking boots, ideal for walking around Venice in winter.

Split the fare for a water taxi in Venice

 

Gondoliers waiting for your custom

 

Venice in winter – dining at the best places

The region of Veneto is known for its comfort style of cooking, and dishes that are ideal for winter. One ingredient that’s seasonal in winter and I can’t get enough of is radicchio. Forget any packet salad radicchio because the variety they have in Veneto is unlike any other.

Breakfast in Venice

With all the walking you’ll be doing in Venice, stopping off to recharge is one of my favourite pastimes. For breakfast, there are tons of good pasticceria places in Venice, serving buttery croissant and frothy cappuccinos.

Take a walk to Campo Santa Margherita, where you’ll find many good breakfast places. For those unfamiliar with how Italians do breakfast, it’s short and sweet. Don’t expect a full English breakfast, or anything containing eggs. A classic Italian breakfast consists of coffee and something sweet, like a croissant or biscotti.

Get the best table, and view, during Venice in winter

 

Where to eat lunch in Venice

Rather than sit down to a standard lunch, try something a little different and head to a cicchetteria. Cicchetti are small snacks or side dishes that not only taste good, but are also budget friendly too. Many bars, known as ‘bacari’ serve up different types of cicchetti, which include sandwiches with various toppings.

There are vegetarian and vegan cicchetti options available too, so everyone gets a try. During winter, you’ll meet more locals at the bacari, whereby the more rustic and no-frills the bacaro, the better.

Once you find a good one, I encourage you to try at least 3 cicchetti. Pair it with a glass of local wine and blend in with the locals if only for a short time.

Tempting Venetian cicchetti

Desserts in Venice

The period between Christmas and carnival in Venice brings with it a smorgasbord of delicious things to try. Frittelle are balls of fried doughy goodness, usually filled with cream or zabaglione. As with the cicchetti places, it’s not easy to find a pasticceria that sells good fritelle. The only thing you can do, is try a few and decide which is best.

During carnival that takes place in Venice in February, another seasonal sweet favourite is Venetian crostoli. These sweet crispy pastries are served with a sprinkling of sugar and are a common sight during carnival.

A favourite Venetian treat during winter and carnival, frittelle

Dinner in Venice

Dining out in Venice can be expensive, but you can’t leave without trying out any of their best restaurants. You not only get the chance to sample excellent Venetian cooking, but also during winter, in a relaxed setting. Visiting in the colder months has many advantages, the first one being availability. Making a reservation at any of the top restaurants in Venice is vital. And in winter, it’s a lot easier.

Some of my favourite restaurants in Venice include La Colombina and Alle Corone. The former’s a cosy style trattoria, where you can eat well without any pretention. Seafood’s served fresh, and no true Venetian kitchen is complete without a bigoli pasta dish on the menu.

Alle Corone is the restaurant of luxury hotel Hotel Ai Reali, and is worth every Euro. Dine on some of the best, and seasonal, Venetian cuisine, while admiring the gondolas passing by your window.

A seasonal and Venetian winter staple, radicchio from Treviso

Winter in Venice – the city is yours

When you travel to Venice during the winter months, there’s moments where you’ll feel like the city is yours. Move away from Piazza San Marco and the Rialto, and discover the ‘backend’ of the city. Cross over the smaller bridges connecting Venice, and stop as often as you like to take photos.

It’s also in these parts of Venice where you see normal life happening. Many visitors tend to forget that people live, work and study in Venice, and during winter, you see it immediately. A good example of this are the workshops where they make the gondolas. It’s only a short distance from the allure of Venice’s Grand Canal, but intriguing to see behind the scenes.

As an amateur photographer, I can’t stress how much better it is to travel to Venice in winter. No angle of the canal or of the Rialto Bridge gets tiresome. Instead, scenes come to life, during the day, or at night. And with the help of a little post production, the colours of Venice pop that bit more.

Venice in winter – stay at top hotels for less

It’s no secret that top hotels reduce their prices during the off-peak season to attract more guests. Saying that, when you travel to Venice in winter, staying at a boutique, luxury boutique or luxury hotel is doable.

Novecento Boutique Hotel

Location, location, location is the buzzword at Novecento Boutique Hotel. It takes around 5 minutes to reach the impressive Gallerie dell’Accademia, and around 10 minutes to reach Piazza San Marco.

The rooms showcase a mixture of Mediterranean and Oriental design, created by Italian artists and stylists. Thai platform beds and Moroccan carpets sit alongside Venetian marble in this wonderfully unique boutique hotel. Breakfast is a homemade affair, in the form of a buffet serving products straight from the market.



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The essential packing list for women

Corte di Gabriela

Spend time in a 4-star boutique hotel that has a modern feel, and treats every guest like royalty. There are 11 suites at Corte di Gabriela, ranging from comfort to the generously sized Junior Suite Balcony.

Breakfast at Corte di Gabriela receives consistently high reviews, and it’s understandable. Items include freshly baked croissants with dark chocolate filling, locally produced ham and Asiago cheese. Steaming coffee sourced from a local coffee roaster is served from the traditional Moka, rounding off the meal.

Families, or larger groups, traveling to Venice may prefer booking one of the suite apartments. They can accommodate 4 people, and Corte di Gabriela provide daily fresh linens and towels for your stay. The apartments are in a separate building a few metres away from the main hotel. Enjoy a ‘home away from home’ experience, and pretend momentarily that you also live in the heart of charming Venice.



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Venetian style architecture

The Gritti Palace

Nothing screams luxury in Venice than checking into a 5-star 15th century palace. Securing one of the top locations on the Grand Canal, The Gritti Palace interiors are even more impressive. Types of accommodation include Patron Canal Suites to Venetian guest rooms. The former offers views of the Grand Canal, marble bathroom with a walk-in shower and unique art adoring the walls.

Venetian guest rooms have Venetian stucco, or Rubelli customed designed silk walls, Murano glass chandeliers, and historical oil paintings.

Whichever type of suite you choose at The Gritti Palace, your stay’s bound to be memorable.

If you’re not already sold on staying at The Gritti Palace, maybe a mention of its spa might do the trick. There are 2 double spa suites with private steam baths decorated in Venetian mosaics. Your skin and general wellbeing is in good hands as they use Sisley Paris products. This premium skincare range is used by many top spas around the world and are extremely effective. Treatments at The Gritti SPA include couple’s massage, facials and a foot bath.



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Have you traveled to Venice in winter? Or do you prefer to visit in summer? Drop me a comment below, I’d love to hear from you!

Till next time, happy boutique travels x

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links, which means I may receive a commission if you click a link and purchase something that I’ve recommended. Thank you for your support.

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